Thursday, March 23, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 23, 2017

This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
            Today’s story is about a surprise for Mr. Abe Jones.  A few days after local resident, Mr. Abe Jones, went away on business in March of 1887, his wife, thought of something that would agreeably surprise her husband and make him have a smile when he came back.  She apparently bought a calf.  The reporter of the “Junction City Union” newspaper asked “Did you ever see or know a woman who, when allowing her fancies to roam over things of comfort, didn’t dream of a cow and plenty of milk, butter and cream?  Mrs. Jones thought of the satisfaction that her husband would have when once it came time to pay the milkman.  She was as pleased as could be when she saw the calf safely tied up in its new stall.
            When Mr. Jones returned home that evening, he was not told of the calf until the next morning.  When Mr. Jones went into the barn, he saw the calf tail whisking in the frosty air.  He also saw the remains of a $40 harness, a colt, which had been shorn to include its tail and a barrel of oats. Mr. Jones was angry.  Then he saw the calf.  He began to hit the calf with a club until Mrs. Jones came out and interceded to save the calf’s life.  Mr. Jones promptly put a sign on his fence that read “calf for sale”. 

            Some men don’t appreciate being surprised.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 22, 2017

This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
            Today’s story is about a place where many early settlers in our area shopped – even some that became famous in American history.

            Mrs. Nancy Taylor wrote in her “Remembrances of Early Days” that her father, John F. Wiley, was one of the earliest settlers when he arrived in 1858.  He took up a claim across the Kansas River, south of Ogden, which later was known as the Old Eskers Place.  However, he was not a successful farmer and sold out, then moved to Junction City in 1860.  It was here that he bought a grocery store.  At that time there were only a dozen families in town, but as the town grew in population and businesses grew, Nancy’s father built an addition to this building and sold both groceries and dry goods.  He also bought buffalo hides and all kinds of fur from the Native Americans and shipped them to Leavenworth, Kansas by ox teams.  Mrs. Taylor mentioned that Bill Hickock and Bill Cody, better known as Wild Bill and Buffalo Bill, used to patronize her father’s store.  After running the store for several years her father sold out, bought a farm again and at one time owned Logan Grove.  Nancy Taylor died in 1929 at the age of 79 years.  

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 21, 2017

This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
            Quick responses to a fire call by the Fire Department were not as efficient in 1929 as it is today.  When we hear the city warning sirens sound today, we do not give much thought to what methods were used in early years. 
            In March of 1929, there were times when people complained because they were unable to get a telephone operator.  At the time of the Trosper fire at 5 A.M. there was only one operator on duty.  She had to call the Fire Department members and inform them of the location of the fire.  The operator then had to call a water works employee to go down and start the pumps in order that pressure might be maintained.  Then she had to call electricians to go down and shut off the power in the vicinity so the firemen might work among the wires in safety AND she had to call the parties whose property was on fire and the businessmen in the vicinity whose property might be threatened. 
            All of this was because the blowing of the light plant whistle for alarms had been discontinued.  It was written that the cost of using the steam for the sole purpose of blowing that whistle meant maintaining enough steam to operate a 250 horsepower engine.  When use of the steam whistle was discontinued, it was necessary to notify volunteer firemen by telephone and often they could not be reached. 
            Two years later in 1931 the City Commission was still struggling to install an efficient and less costly fire alarm.  We can be thankful for our current communication systems and the work our Fire Fighters do to not only fight fires, but provide us with emergency medical assistance.


Monday, March 20, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 20, 2017

You are listening to “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.

            Today’s story is about Annie Rohrer’s teaching contract for the 1881 school year.
Her contract was between School District Number 16 in Davis County, in the State of Kansas and herself.  Annie was a qualified teacher and the contract stated that she was to teach, govern and conduct the public schools to the best of her ability.  She was to keep a register of the daily attendance and studies of each pupil and other records as the District’s School Board may require.  She was to endeavor to preserve the good condition and order of the school house, grounds, furniture and such other district property as shall come under the immediate supervision of said teacher. 
            This contract was for a term of school months beginning on the 14th day of March 1881.  She was to receive the sum of ………..$30.00 per school month.
            The District agreed to keep the school house in good repair, to provide the necessary fuel and a school register for her to keep track of the required records the School Board requested. 

            The final paragraph of the contract was rather ominous.  It stated: “Provided that in case said teacher shall be legally dismissed from school or shall have her certificate legally annulled, expiration or otherwise, then said teacher shall not be entitled to compensation from and after such dismissal or annulment.”

Friday, March 17, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 17, 2017

March 17, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
            Today is “St. Patrick’s Day”, which reminds us that the Irish were the most prominent ethnic group represented among the early settlers of Junction City and Geary County.  Perhaps the most legendary Irishman in our local history was Tom Cullinan.  He was among Junction City’s most famous early law men.  Citizens referred to him as Tom Allen. Tom made his reputation and kept the peace with his fists rather than with a gun.
            The “Junction City Union” editor, George W. Martin, wrote an article about Tom Allen Cullinan upon Tom’s death.  The article included some of the following information:  “Tom Allen Cullinan was only eleven years of age when he left the home of his well-to-do parents in Ireland and went to sea.  This was the beginning of a life of adventure, which took him from the seaports of England and Ireland to the Crimean in 1854, the mining camps of gold-rush Colorado, the cattle ranching operation of Kit Carson and Lucas Maxwell on the Cimmaron and finally served as a scout for Union forces in Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Missouri during the Civil War. 
            It was after the war in 1866, that the Cullinan’s first arrived in Geary County.  Tom had a contract to supply beef to the Army at Fort Riley.  He worked in that capacity between here and Fort Laramie for several years, but in 1871 he became the Marshall of Junction City.”
            Again, according to the newspaper editor, Tom Cullinan “had a fist with which he could split an inch board and he always gave a lick under the left jaw, which never failed to lay a man out.  While he always carried a gun, her preferred to use his fists, because he never wanted to kill.
            Tom Allen was about five feet nine inches tall and weighed about 175 pounds.  Although his physical size was not great, he met all comers for years and never knew defeat.  Along with being the City Marshall, Cullinan was a Sheriff’s Officer and also the Fire Chief.  At the time of his death in 1904, Tom Allen had been city Marshall since 1872 and served under 18 mayors.”
                                   

              

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 16, 2017

March 16, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
Today’s story is about a person who won a 1949 Ford at the Merchant’s Expo in Junction City in 1949.  Junction City’s weekly newspaper, the “Republic” announced on March 10th in 1949 that on Friday and Saturday of that week, Junction City merchants would stage a show of the latest in merchandise at the annual Merchant’s Exposition sponsored by the Junior Chamber of Commerce.  Two evenings of entertainment were planned for the event, which took place in the Municipal Auditorium. 
            The always popular WIBW entertainers would appear in a show beginning at 8:00 Friday night.  A three hour show would be provided Saturday night, beginning at 7:00 with a 90 minute talent show which was arranged by the Fort Riley Special Service Office.  Following that show, six Junction City stores would stage a combined style show beginning at 8:30 PM.
            The climax of the Exposition was to come at 10:00 PM on Saturday with the awarding of a new 1949 Ford by the Junction City Chamber of Commerce.  Other merchandise valued at more than $500 was slated to be given away as door prizes during the two day event.  Among the gifts were an innerspring mattress, three radios, a pen and pencil set, three sets of fog lights, a spotlight, an electric iron, a waffle iron, a coffee maker, a fishing reel and casting rod, tailor made seat covers, a blanket and bed spread set and many other gifts.

            Free Coca-Cola was offered on both days of the Exposition. The only charge for all this was an admission fee of 35 cents for adults and 15 cents for children to the Friday night show. Saturday’s activities were all free. 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 15, 2017

March 15, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
When I first began volunteering at the Museum about 7 years ago, there were two words I didn’t know and even had difficulty pronouncing.  The words were “accessioning” and “deaccessioning”.  Thankfully, Gaylynn Childs, who was then our Executive Director, helped me with both the pronunciation and definition of these words.  These words are unique to curators and their work.  There is often limited space to store items in a Museum and ours is no different.  So… in our case the Curator and two members of the Geary County Historical Society meet on an as needed basis to consider items donated or on loan to the Museum.  Since our focus is on Geary County history, it is important that the items be either from this area or have significance to this county.  “Accessioning” then is about acquiring those items that meet the criteria of having been created or used in Geary County, have a direct connection with historical events in Geary County or which have a direct connection with residents of the county.  The items may be from all time periods, they must be in good condition, be well documented by the donor and be needed in the Museum’s collection to fill a gap and not be viewed as adding excessive duplication to the current collection.  “Deaccessioning” is the term used when it is determined that there is a need to remove items from holdings by the Museum. The items may be returned to the owner or person who made the donation, be destroyed or see the item or items may be sold. 
           



Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 14, 2017

March 14, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
            John P. Grasberger first arrived in Kansas in 1855 as a soldier with the 2nd Dragoons.  He had come to America as a young German immigrant in 1852.  After completing his 5 year enlistment, he purchased bounty land northwest of Fort Riley.  He joined the Army again at the outbreak of the Civil War and served as an officer in the Union Army until 1864 when he returned to Kansas with his wife, Susan Maxfield, of Arkansas.
            The newlywed Grasbergers settled on his farm about a mile west of what would become the Alida town site, in Smoky Hill Township.  Soon other families were settling nearby and in 1866 a school was built on the Grasberger farm.  In 1872, John built a log store beside the railroad track, which he operated while his wife ran the post office in their home.  A short time later, he added a warehouse near his store for the storage and handling of grain. 
            In the early 1880’s Susan Grasberger died and in 1886 at the age of 50, John married 24 year old Hedwig or “Hattie” Wolters who had recently arrived in Kansas from Berlin.  This union was blessed with three children.  In 1890, John Grasberger sold his Alida store to P.H Gfeller and devoted his efforts to farming and raising his young family.  In 1902, he fell from a ladder and died from his injuries leaving a legacy of honorable service to his community and his family.
            




Monday, March 13, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 13, 2017

March 13, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
Today’s story is about the printing press in the basement of the Museum.  It has been moved several times to other locations, but as you will hear in this story, it ended back where it started. 
            The printing press, which began its operation in the Junction City High School at 6th and Adams Streets between 1904 and 1929, is once again rolling.  On May 1, 1994, the Chandler and Price press that stood idle for a number of years is once again in operation. 
            The high school at the turn of the 20th century was located in the building, which is now the GCHS Museum.  The press served as a tool for teaching the printing trade to high school students, who printed the school newspaper and other information in the school district. 
            The press was moved to the Junior/Senior High School at 9th and Adams Streets when the high school moved to that location in 1929.  Later it was used in the print shop operated by USD 475 in another location.  Still later it was loaned to the Geary County Historical Society and moved to their first museum at 117 West 7th Street in the old Durland Furniture Store.  When the Museum was given the old Departmental Building at 6th and Adams by Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bramlage in 1982 it was once again moved to the building where it had first started.  USD 475 donated the press to the Historical Society in 1992.  After the press was cleaned and serviced and type set, the press was put back to use by the Society for demonstrations to visitors on May 1, 1994.
           


Friday, March 10, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 10, 2017

March 10, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
Today’s story is about Girl Scouts.  This Sunday, March 12, is the birthday anniversary of the Girl Scout Organization.  Junction City Girl Scouts was a newly formed group in 1939.  Girl Scouts across America had more than half a million members.  Girls and their leaders held programs varying from fancy dress parties to formal receptions with many important guests.  They were all celebrating the twenty-seventh anniversary of the day the late Juliette Gorden Low of Savannah, Georgia who organized the first troop of Girl Scouts in the United States.  Stories were told of her tremendous vitality, her wit and humor, her capacity for making friends and her perseverance in getting the Girl Scouts launched in the United States. 
            A special party was held in New York, which was to be attended by many prominent guests and was to be the highlight of a week’s observance.  Many radio stars also shared birthday greetings to the organization on the radio.  Among them was Fanny Brice of the “Good News 1939” program and Irene Wicker, the “singing lady” of the NBC Network.
            We want to express our appreciation to all the Girl Scout leaders in our area who do so much to encourage girls to continually improve themselves, our communities, our schools and be positive role models in their families. 
                                   





Thursday, March 9, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 9, 2017

March 9, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
Today’s program is about an act that appeared at the Opera House in April of 1909.
            An article in the “Junction City Union” newspaper included comments by the writer about the upcoming event which read as follows:
            “Comparatively few people can afford the luxury of traveling abroad, but everyone can enjoy the delights of travel without any of its discomforts by journeying via Lyman Howe’s “Travel Circus Magic Lantern Show” appearing at the Opera House this Thursday evening. In his newest video program, Mr. Howe promised to escort his travelers to the Montreal Ice Palace and Winter Carnival then through the scenic grandeur of the Rockies in the winter and into the heart of the great Canadian wilds, where the severe life of the lumber camp would be shown.
By taking them to the top of a battleship, he promised everyone an experience which could happen to few.  The stirring and striking scenes on the deck below would impart a new sensation. In fact the whole program would be extremely diverting and delightful, ranging from the sublimely beautiful scenes of sunset and moonlight on land and sea to the inner mechanisms of the great ship.  The show was to include a tour through France and any other European States.  It would conclude with distinctly novel portraits of English noblemen.”
            This was a way to virtually transport people to other places for a short while then return them home again to Junction City without leaving their seats in the Opera House.  This magic continues at our Opera House when we attend programs there.  If you haven’t been to a show or have never been in the Opera House, stop by during the day after 10:00 for a tour. You may want to call first.  The number is 238-3906.  This has been “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.







Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 8, 2017

March 8, 2017
            This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
            We have many interesting displays in our galleries at the Museum at the corner of Sixth and Adams Streets in Junction City and we invite you to come and see them.  The Museum is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 1 until 4 in the afternoon and admission is free.
In today’s program, we would like to share about some of the displays on the first floor in Gallery One.  Heather, our Curator has created a potpourri of items around the theme “Curiosity Cabinets”, which were popular in the 1800’s.  One such item was the “What-Not Shelves”.  The passion for collecting and displaying ornamental objects began in the 18th century and was widespread in the 19th.  This led to the creation of personal “What-Not Shelves” or curio cabinets.  These were usually placed in the parlor and were used to display family treasures.  The display at the Museum has a collection of things like sea shells, human hair, an armadillo basket, and even a memory jug.  “Memory Jugs” were particularly popular with the Victorians.  They were made with a vessel, plaster and knickknacks.  The knickknacks were of value to the owner.  In the example we have on display, G.F. Gordon’s pipe and other small items were cemented onto a jar and lightly sprayed with gold paint then put on display as a way to remember him after he had passed. 
            There are many other items on display in our “Curiosity Cabinets” including a cape made out of monkey’s hair, a baby’s coffin, home embalming equipment and many others.  Stop by and see these unique items when you have a few minutes or a few hours and you will see why we say “Our Past Is Present”. 


Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 7, 2017

March 7, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
Today’s story comes from a March 1874 “Junction City Tribune” newspaper article in which the reporter gave this account of a visit to the Davis (now Geary) County Poor Farm.  He wrote:  “On last Monday, Bob Wilson dragged me out to the poor farm behind a spanking team of bays and in company with N.L. Prentis of this city and Hugh Cook of Lawrence.  Both were respectable paupers.  We found the farm in quite admirable condition.  We have already forgotten how many trees have been set out this season, but the number runs way up into the thousands.  All of them are doing well and but a very few have died.  A large orchard is growing and it will be sheltered by a large number of forest trees.  Mr. Wilson, the manager, is getting things into tip-top shape.  By the time his lease expires the county will have a farm that will support all the paupers and leave a surplus.  What Bob DON’T know about the growing of trees and their proper arrangement isn’t worth knowing and he is putting his knowledge and skill to use that will prove a public benefit.  He is doing more work for less money than has ever been done in Davis County.  He becomes completely disgusted whenever anyone mentions that Davis County has no tillable land, for he knows better, having proved the falsity of the statement.”

            Perhaps this was a slow news day in Junction City.  

Monday, March 6, 2017

Our Past Is Present March 6, 2017

March 6, 2017
This is “Our Past Is Present” from the Geary County Historical Society.
Today’s story is about some men who had tried boring for coal near where the Union
Pacific shops once stood in Junction City in the spring of 1873.  A vein of high impregnated salt brine was found 290 feet below the ground’s surface.  An analysis showed that one gallon of this brine made three and a half pounds of salt.  A salt production operation was begun almost immediately using the evaporation process.  This business was managed by Mr. C. R. Adams.  Two engines were at work on the site.  One pumped brine from the old well into the pans and the other ran the drilling machinery in the new well.  The new well was down about 45 feet and was sinking at a rate of 8 to 10 feet per day.  This 6 inch well was said to furnish an immense amount of brine and was sure to make Junction City one of the saltiest spots on earth. The newspaper observed to their readers that “Grumblers who were eternally talking about the opportunities to be found in towns down the line on the new railroads, or the “booming Solomon Valley” are advised to open their eyes and look at what Junction City has to offer.”  We think this is good advice even today!!!